Posts Tagged ‘Technology’

jsNoSpam – make it harder for bots to find your email address

March 6, 2016

If you want to put an email address on a web page, and have it human readable and easy to click on to open up in a mail client you run the risk of exposing yourself to one of the sleazier sides of the internet. Spam email. There are bots out there which relentlessly hunt down email addresses so their masters can deluge you with unsolicited commercial email (or worse, virus infections).

The best solution is to never show the email address – get your users to use a “Contact Us” form or similar so that there’s nothing for the bots to find. But sometimes you can’t do that, either because of how the pages are hosted or your client simply doesn’t want you to.

So… jsNoSpam was born. 100% javascript, so all client side and easy to insert anywhere that allows you to edit raw HTML and include javascript.

The script works by doing a number of things…

  • Requires you to encode the email addresses so they never appear in a recognizable form in the script or HTML source.
  • Supports decoding the email address back to a usable format
  • Allows you to display the de-coded address on the page, or to require a user action (mouse over, click, keyboard navigation etc) before revealing the address.

Because the email address which is inserted into the page via the script is clickable and usable like any regular mailto: link would be user inconvenience is reduced to a minimum, but the effort for a bot to scrape the address is increased and hopefully as there are enough potential variants in how the script can be applied it will keep it ahead of the game.

Here is a live demo of the code in action.

The code is hosted on GitHub, and is open source and unrestricted license (though it would be great if you find it useful if you comment here). It’s been tested in as many browsers as I can and also with assistive technologies (eg NVDA) but if you do find an issue please comment (or better yet fire off a pull request for me to incorporate your fix).

On their own, the techniques used (encoding the address, requiring user intervention etc) are not new, but hopefully combined they will produce a robust enough solution for people who need this workaround.

Advertisements

Could Skype be the one communications client to rule them all?

June 23, 2014

Google has Google Voice (soon to be part of Hangouts, expanding their footprint for the ailing – or morphing – Google+ by forcing users to switch), Facebook has their Messenger client, there’s Viber and Line in the Voice space and WhatsApp and SnapChat delivering text and image messaging. The iPhone has Visual Voicemail and iMessage. Where is Microsoft fit in all of this? (more…)

Change the conversation – don’t play the numbers game.

July 12, 2013

For new entrants to the phone or tablet market the conversation always turns to how many apps there are. At launch, a year later, how fast the numbers are growing. The conversation is driven by the incumbents and echoed by the press and makes it very hard for a newcomer to be taken seriously.

What would happen though if a new entrant to the space, such as Mozilla with the Firefox Phone, decides not to obsess about the numbers game, but own the narrative and re-write the rules…

If you play the numbers game means you are spread thin, chasing a huge catalog and will constantly be behind the ball playing “me too” and catch up at the mercy of the big fish who probably don’t see you worth the effort until you have an established presence.

Defining your rules allows you to identify a small selection, maybe a dozen, of apps that users want, need or actually use as a base line and expend significant effort working with those partners to create the best version of their experience on your platform.

You help with engineering, dollars and resources, providing money, talent and demonstrating true partnership. Engage deeply with your partners and share the risk – you both need to comfortable enough to experiment with new features on your new platform, to iterate and fail fast but within that small group drive their success while establishing your new platform and demonstrating what is possible.

For most of the incumbents this isn’t the way they play the game. Apple dictate to partners secure in their position, Google, with Android, rely on OEMs and the scale of their store to drive developers. Microsoft have a huge field Evangelism organization who can wield marketing dollars but are chasing numbers and have quarterly goals to meet and don’t seem to have the patience for long term engagements any more. BlackBerry are desperately copying any playbook that seems to make work but are finding resurrecting their brand hard going.

For a new player it’s a losing proposition to try and get into their race. Even if you launch with 50 thousand apps there will be the issue of quality and questions around the presence of the “must haves” who won’t have taken the risk, and every omission will hurt. If you make the headlines read “Twitter launches their next generation client on Firefox OS“, “Evernote delivers game changing update first for Firefox OS” you can control the conversation.

By controlling the conversation you become a platform that is aspirational and seen as innovative.

That is where technology evangelism has to return too, not being driven by the same old marketing and PR story that is seen as safe conventional widsom